Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Reading about wild weather & learning about hurricanes (ages 5-16)

The weather this fall has certainly been wild. Two major hurricanes have ravaged communities in Texas, Florida and the Caribbean. Build on students' interest by sharing a range of books that explore the causes of extreme weather and the way scientists work to predict and understand the weather.
Younger children:

Hurricanes (Smithsonian Little Explorer), by Martha E.H. Rustad -- a good introduction with accessible text, short sentences, dramatic photographs and clear diagrams. Ages 6-10. Reading level, 2nd grade.

Fly Guy Presents: Weather, by Tedd Arnold -- blending humor and information, this book captures kids' attention. The text is definitely more complex than the Fly Guy stories, making it good to read aloud to young Fly Guy fans. Clear information, excellent diagrams and labels. Ages 5-10. Reading level, 3rd grade.

Hurricane Watch, by Melissa Stewart -- this picture book focuses on how scientists track storms and what you can do to keep yourself safe if one is coming. Engaging, clear information, with expressive illustrations. Ages 5-9. Reading level, 3rd grade.

Older children & teens:

Extreme Weather (A True Book), by Ann Squire -- Focusing on key questions like what makes a tornado deadly and how a storm surge is created, this book explores how scientists study weather. Longer paragraphs will help children learn more in depth about these topics, without overwhelming them. Ages 8-12. Reading level, 4th grade.

Eye of the Storm: NASA, Drones, and the Race to Crack the Hurricane Code (Scientists in the Field), by Amy Cherrix -- dramatic writing pulls students into wanting to know more about cyclones, their deadly power and the scientists that are studying them. Beginning with a look at Hurricane Sandy, which lulled many New Yorkers into thinking it posed insignificant risk because it was a Category 1 hurricane, Cherrix keeps the focus squarely on the people who are affected by and who study these powerful storms. Try reading short sections aloud to pique students' interest. Ages 9-17. Reading level, 8th grade.

Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans, by Don Brown -- this comic book delivers a powerful look at the destruction caused by Hurricane Katrina, helping students understand the flooding, distress, anger, pain and death that followed in its aftermath. The visual depiction of the devastation and the inadequate government response are captured in a powerful way, and not sensationalized. Ages 10-17. Reading level, 6th grade.

Read more about choosing nonfiction for developing readers in the article I wrote with Alyson Beecher:
"Beyond Reading Levels: Choosing Nonfiction for Developing Readers," by Mary Ann Scheuer and Alyson Beecher, School Library Journal (August 28, 2017)
Many kids and adults prefer reading nonfiction, especially books that help them understand the world around us. It's important to build children's knowledge gradually, seeking out books that increase in complexity. This helps students build their reading muscles, digging into more complex books without getting totally overwhelmed.

Many teachers tell students to find “just right books” -- but how do you know what a book's reading level is? Open it up and read a few paragraphs or pages. I tell my students that the only way they can tell if a book is right for them is to read a little bit of it. Look at the vocabulary and sentences. Look at the design and layout. Ask your child what they think about it. This is much more important than knowing the specific level.

The review copies came from our school and public libraries. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.

©2017 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books


  1. If you're looking for another picture book to add to your list, I can recommend my book, OVER IN THE WETLANDS: A HURRICANE-ON-THE-BAYOU STORY.

  2. Both this week and last week's posts are timely indeed!

  3. Thanks so much for including Eye of the Storm! Delighted to be in the company of such good books.

  4. Love this post Mary Ann...thank you for sharing.